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Wednesday, May 04, 2005

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Fine art of pen pushing


The word Kalamkari originates from kalam (pen) and kari (work). The best-known practitioners of the ancient art (known to have a history of 3,000 years) are from the temple town of Sri Kalahasti in Andhra Pradesh.

In the early years, this work was done on cotton fabric depicting stories from Hindu epics, because the town's temple was the chief patron of the art.

The art has seen several contemporary variations over the years and is today a much-sought after textile art. Kalamkari prints can be seen on saris and duppattas and on the walls of hotels and corporate houses.

The process of making traditional Kalamkari is laborious and completely organic. Done entirely by the human hand, it involves great attention to detail.

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