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Abstract is the way to go for city art shows

The artists serve as the protagonists and storytellers of their visual media


Two ongoing art shows in the city indulge in the world of abstraction and its accompanying freedom of interpretations. Painting in varied mediums and supports such as acrylic sheets, wood, canvas or paper and working with bronze form the crux of both exhibitions. The representative mode is equally wide ranging, covering the gamut from the figurative to the abstract.

Chippa Sudhakar's show titled Landscape of Inner Space is on at the Kalakriti Art Gallery till May 4. Extreme earthiness infused by exoticism of form and colour underlines this show. Sudhakar's works reveal a successful mixture of the traditions he inheritsand his personal thinking. The formal and thematic content of his paintings expresses a constant wandering into a world of fantasy, but this is only one facet of his art. Reality is never far from his canvas, executed by the lyricism of the brush and pigment. Having forsaken print-making for painting, Sudhakar has employed various techniques like linocut, painting and engraving on new wood to represent progress while keeping to tradition.

Artistic depth

The magical combination of wood and paint has resulted in a rare fusion of the real and surreal. His painted imagery with shallow relief enhances the plurality of life. B. Rohini Reddy and B. Srinivas Reddy's show at the Shrishti Art Gallery titled Sculptures and Paintings is also on till May 4. While Rohini uses the fascinating medium of bronze to sculpt forms that resemble the mother goddess, Srinivas has worked acrylic on canvas excepting for three fibreglass heads with an idea emerging as a lotus.


Women, full breasted and greened in bronze, mould circles with the serpentine outgrowths that crowd the Rohini's frame of sculptures. Mysterious, pure and yet intimate her sculptures are renunciations of recognisable images. B. Srinivas in his rendition of the life of the Buddha, never fails to mesmerize and in his superb work his lines crisscross with exceptional energy and power.

The colour sensibility of the artist hallmarks each canvas either by the presence of drama or vibrancy, or by serene and meditative qualities. A part of his own spiritual quest, the monk's head remains central to his canvas with scenes from the life of the enlightened one running through the borders. In shades of green, red and orange he has brought to the fore the central theme of Buddhist philosophy.

DEEPA ALEXANDER

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