Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Mar 28, 2005

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Chennai
Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Curves and cravings

It's the creatures of the deep again at Samundari Kazana, a food fest at Le Royal Meridien

— Pic. by S. R. Raghunathan

Prawn and pomfret: The Samundari Kazana at Navaratna

THE DEEP blue is in again and so are its gorgeous bodies. Please cast your covetous eyes this way and let your feelings show. Don't hold anything back. Uninhibited, that's what I was at the Samundari Kazana (on till March 31) at Navaratna, Le Royal Meridien. An utterly human reaction to the temptation on offer.

Like the rotund cherubs in Renaissance paintings, plump prawns figured in my dinner as a recurring theme. Who said ripe, lush curves are out? My fascination with curves began with the beautifully arched pinkish white prawns smeared with dark brown masala. It was Yerra kal masala and in true Kollywood style, romance bloomed at first sight. With Jalpari biriyani, the gentle curves matured into perfect round figures. Fat, succulent prawns in the dish will turn any seafood lover into a glutton. Thankfully the spices were kept at a moderate level so as not to drown the intrinsic flavour of the shellfish. After all it is not the done thing to let the sub-plot steal the thunder from the main story.

Another variation was the Chingudi vada. Here the combination of prawns with lentils camouflaged the true flavour of the prawns. Dal with its robust taste simply refused to play second fiddle. The other Southern dish, Surra puttu, was average. Moving up westwards representing the Konkan coast was Pomfret amti. The tangy gravy with pieces of raw mango was nice, but a smaller sized fish never cannot hold a candle to a mature one.

There was no happy ending either. The Blueberry kulfi fell far short of expectations, with traditional flavours drowning that of the berries. The spot of fruit jelly on the side clashed violently with the kulfi. Athipazham or fig halwa was a better choice.

With competition hotting up, it is understandable that hotels are hard pressed to come up with promotions. Meridien is no exception. A seafood festival will be more interesting if it is not restricted to just prawns, three varieties of fish and crab. These feature anyway on a regular menu. Haven't we seen enough of Patrani macchi and Jhinga achari? A little more imagination is all that is needed to achieve success.

MARIEN MATHEW

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2005, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu