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All sound, no noise

Koel Purie is on song with "White Noise". ANUJ KUMAR speaks to the actress keen to go places.


`I WANT the moon... film industry has exploited just a speck of my talent... an actor can't have moral issues.'z Sounds unconventional coming from an Indian actress? Not with Koel Purie. Epitomising the new age Indian heroine, she has created a place for herself away from the Bollywood mainstream with films like HBO's Dirty War, Ashwin Kumar's Road to Laddakh and Rahul Bose's Everybody Says I'm Fine. Now in Vinta Nanda's White Noise Koel plays a character quite close to her real self when it comes to ambition. Set in a production house, she plays Gauri, a talented scriptwriter whose personal life is in a mess. She is hardworking and a hard drinker, aggressive and abusive - interesting combination by Bollywood's standards. "As an actor you play a character and its point of view so you can't be moralistic about it. Any way every human has grey shades. Why not present it in reel characters as well," asserts Koel.

Rahul Bose plays the man who brings her wavering frequencies under control. Their chemistry on both sides of the screen is being talked about. Koel affirms, "It is about comfort factor. We share a sweet friendship. Knowing each other's strengths we could take a scene anywhere. However, I must tell you the best sequence we delivered was when we were not on talking terms. The scene was in Haridwar on a rock. There is lots of physicality in the scene but it has come out very natural."

No reverse gear

Daughter of media baron Arun Purie, she dabbled with news for a while, reading bulletins and hosting shows for Doordarshan. Koel maintains that was more for getting a hang of the camera rather than interest in journalism.

"You can't say I have taken a reverse route to Bollywood. I have spent three years at Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts and have done some meaningful work on British television and cinema. I feel Bollywood is going through a phase where films are being written around heroines. The production values are changing for better and the parameters of beauty are shifting away from the conventional." She offers Rani Mukerjee as example. "She is not the typical Bollywood beauty still she illuminates the screen with her presence and skills." Koel nods she is eyeing the same slot. "Till date I have done in-your-face kind of roles with lots of grunge. Now I want to explore my feminine side." She shares even her dress style is going to change this spring. So Koel is turning to mainstream with films like Soni Razdan's Nazar, where right now the focus is on Pakistan star Meera. "Let the film release, the attention will shift. Then I am doing Dil Deke Dekho and Vinta's next project tentatively titled Kali."

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