Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Saturday, Feb 19, 2005

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Bangalore
Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Madurai    Mangalore    Pondicherry    Tiruchirapalli    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Inner voice on canvas

Art looks back at us from inside out, says Gregory Lent. But how much of this profound thought translates to art is another issue



Since there are no art supply stores in Tiruvannamalai, the artist began seeing everything in town as a potential component for art.

"IT TURNS out that growing as an artist and growing as a person are the same thing," says Gregory Lent, who lives in Tiruvannamalai, the small town in Tamil Nadu that is home to the Ramana Maharshi ashram. He was drawn to the place because it was good for meditation.

Art as sadhana

"Art too is sadhana," the artist says. "I learn to listen more deeply to the inner voice, letting creation happen by itself, with less interference from `me'. This inner quest has become the dominant theme in my life. As an artist, I explore the inner energies encountered in this process... In the end, the secret of art is that art looks at us, from the inside out. We are both the eye that sees and the I that is seen."

Lent's exhibition, The Secret of Art, currently on at the Time and Space Art Gallery, has on display what he calls three-dimensional works. The artist explains that since there are no art supply stores in Tiruvannamalai, he began seeing everything in town as a potential component for art. Like the sticks used by water pump repairmen, copper wires, bamboo pieces, waste wood from the workshop where window frames are made, paint from the hardware shop... "It is in the shapes from ordinary life that I have seen the possibility of expressing the energies found in my inner world."

Even as one tries to grasp the artist's profound thoughts and innovative spirit, what the viewer really gets to see are some garish motifs, designs and symbols. There is an amount of neat craft and simulated vigour in some of the works, but even in those instances, the outcome falls short in terms of real aesthetic or emotional content. The symbols too turn out to be quite predictable and clichéd as in Bindu of Emptiness, Agni Bindu and The Ascension Within.

One does see attempts to manifest some imaginative designs as in Eye of Shiva and Ascent of the Feminine, but most of them end up being decorative and patterned images and nothing beyond that.

In fact, the most effective forms emerge from the small-sized pieces where the minimalist constructs effectively translate into more intuitive and less pretentious ideas and impressions.

The exhibition concludes on February 21.

ATHREYA

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Madurai    Mangalore    Pondicherry    Tiruchirapalli    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright © 2005, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu