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Magic on canvas

Young artists explore a variety of themes at this exhibition

Pic. K. Ananthan

THEY CALL themselves `Maya Thurigaigal' (magical brushes).

Their works too seem to have a magical aura about them-whether it is the acrylic on canvas painting of Vinayaka or the mixed media paintings or the oil on canvas works.

The exhibition of paintings and drawings of III year students of the Government College of Fine Arts, Chennai, at the Kasthuri Sreenivasan Art Gallery, provided the right platform to showcase their skills.

Though nature is the dominant theme, there is variety. And the students have used all media for their paintings. The mixed media works of S. Kathiravan stand out for their sheer beauty.

One of his paintings, `dream girl', made with sand as base with the hand and neck portions worked in oil is indeed fascinating.

He has even pasted hair on top to give the portrait a `realistic touch'.

The seascape sketch, another mixed media creation, is a little different from the ones that you get to see.

There is no misty sky and a vibrant blue sea in this canvas. What you see is earthy sand colours.

It is difficult to identify the elephant god in the `Vinayaka dance' painting.

Take a closer look and you can make out the black outline of the god drawn around bright red spots.

Life-like portraits

R. Bakyaraj finds pen drawings exciting.

Most of his works belong to this genre of painting. Still life works are his forte.

"Though it is a lot more difficult and takes time, you can create your own style in pen drawings," he says.

A drawing of `Evil coming to world' based on French painter Albert Durer's work is a prominent exhibit in his collection.

Nature and wildlife are the dominant themes in the paintings of W. Suresh.

He has used lots of patches and strokes in his watercolour paintings.

M. Prakash's dry pastel work of a girl with a pot is `close to life'.

Small is beautiful, they say. You will only endorse this adage after looking at the palette knife paintings of R. Solomon. The artist has come up with some wonderful creations. The sketch of a ship caught in a tide is one among them.

Village vistas

Village scenes and images from daily life are the two common running themes in the oil and canvas works of V. Sivakumar. He has showcased portraits of a flower seller, mobile hotel, ploughing, harvesting, and bullock cart.

The pencil works of S. Anitha and watercolour paintings of J. Geetha have also been displayed.

"In Chennai, people like modern art. Here they prefer landscapes and still life work. The exhibition has been a good learning experience for us," the students say.

The exhibition, which is the second in the `Growing young artists-2005' series, is open between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. till February 15.

M. ALLIRAJAN

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