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Medley of ideas

The works of four art students reflect their individual style and their experimentation with techniques


THE WORKS of four final year students of the College of Fine Arts, on show Palazzo Art Gallery, have the artists' unique stamp. Each artist has a different style and seems to be experimenting with various techniques and ideas.

B. Ramakrishnan is obviously fond of Ravi Varma's style. His `Revathi', `Pattu Mami' and `Music Class' depict women in a realistic manner. Even the composition of the last mentioned work is reminiscent of one of Ravi Varma's well-known paintings. He has been able to recreate the textures of silk and zari well, as also the shape of the hands; a little more attention to skin tones would improve the overall impression. `Lily Pond' captures a rural landscape. The painting of a part of a pomegranate tree is impressive, revealing careful observation.

Quick brush strokes


French master Cezanne seems to have had a lot of impact on young Kumaresan. His view of buildings seen from a higher level and distance reminds one of the master's works. While some of his landscapes are quite realistic, a couple of others border on the abstract, though there is a hint of trees and buildings; the quick brush work as well as the combination and juxtaposition of colours add to this effect.

Gurunathan seems to go in for surrealistic expressions. `Cat in my mind' shows a curled-up white cat — or is that of cross between a cat and a dog? — on the right top of a large canvas, while the rest of the area is left black. `Myself' is quite a large black and white self-portrait, the eyes looking intensely at the viewer. `Real depth,' a black line drawing, show a man who looks like his is deep in meditation; the paper with the drawing is deliberately stuck at an angle on the mount; is this an attempt to attract attention or just a desire to be different? `Personal Garden I and II' are commendable works.

Abstract

There are just four works of Dilipkumar on view. The untitled work is an abstract idea — a brown channel-like form appears to be fixed on an ochre background; the edges of the brown segment look like a cobbler's stitches. One landscape is realistic depiction of a palm tree lined road. The other two are just plain white except for lines of blue trickling down from the top. And he calls them landscapes! Is he challenging the viewers' sensibilities or defying them?

The show is on till February 3.

LAKSHMI VENKATRAMAN

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