Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Chennai
Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Hyderabad   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Angst and the artist

A. C. Rajasekaran, whose approach to painting is formalist, focusses on still life objects



One of the works by A. C. Rajasekaran

THE STORY of art as it configures within a globalised world, assumes dimensions that can be read as complex, multidimensional, sophisticated, naive, humorous and wily or simply poetic and enchanting. Within this post-modern context where a work of art has assumed the aura of engaging itself as a cultural object waiting to be decodified, there are some artists who are cocooned and self-contained to be overwhelmed by their response to life that seemingly passes them by.

The artist in question is A. C. Rajasekaran, whose approach to painting is formalist, exploring through the medium of still life objects the elements of textures and colours. This is his first solo show in Chennai.

Working in the Research and Design Department of Weavers Service Centre, Chennai, and an alumnus of the Government College of Arts and Crafts, Rajasekaran seemingly has arrived with `Still Life' as his vocabulary. Staid and visually unchallenging, the still life objects in his paintings executed primarily in mixed media offer little interest. Having tried his hand at abstracts and feeling uncomfortable in handling space, he moved on to rendering figures and is now at ease with still life objects.

Minimalist

The objects that he has ventured to portray are minimal namely vases, flowers and fruits. His technique nevertheless displays maturity and years of experience. It is his technique that provides vital clues to the angst experienced by the artist, as he earnestly attempts to define the contours of his individual style. But, he has to metamorphose and dramatically transcend the mundane representation of his subject or imbue them with a deeper reality of particular significance if he intends to reach a certain level in his creative profession. Colours are his strength in the way he has melded, juxtaposed and abruptly contrasted them to create interesting intersections. The blues and oranges sing vibrantly and in harmony, reds and greens offer serenity with warmth, while the purples and blues evoke a sense of spirituality.

The coloured objects are adeptly controlled with tight and confident strokes. His paintings summarily evoke an expressionist feel mainly in their conscious distortions. Unfortunately they are not tethered with few powerful and select strokes. Still life as a genre within contemporary context holds out myriad possibilities of exploring varied dimensions. Among the numerous paintings that are largely focussed on still life, there are a few works delineating domestic animals and dynamic horses. These few paintings provide interesting visual breaks.

The show is on at Vinyasa Art Gallery, TTK Road, till January 30.

ASHRAFI S. BHAGAT

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Hyderabad   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2005, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu