Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Jan 17, 2005

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Chennai
Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Mural magic

Natanam finds artistic satisfaction in creating murals



Stylised and colourful: Natanam's mural depicting Krishna lifting the Govardhana mountain

SRINI LANKA, who built a house in Texas, wanted a large mural. And he wanted one made by artist Natarajan, popularly known as Natanam. So particular was he that he was willing to wait a year for the artist to make it. Natanam created three murals — a vertical one (8'x3') to be fixed near the entrance, a horizontal one (12'x4') for the living room and a square one (2'x2').

Indian designs

The horizontal panel made of thick plywood depicts the story of Krishna lifting the Govardhana mountain. The stylised and colourful work shows Krishna in the middle, lifting the mountain with his little finger as men and women look at him with reverence. Some cows add to the overall effect. The background is decorated with typical Indian designs. Brass is used for the jewellery and other ornamentation, while Krishna's jewellery is gold plated.

The palanquin bearers, horses and trees in the square mural have a toy-like appearance.

The vertical piece is contemporary in concept and the faces in the lower half are similar to the illustrations that Natanam draws for several Tamil magazines. As the eyes move up, the faces become part of the pattern and can easily be missed.

From a distance, the background glistens with shades of blue and green; get closer and they turn out to be tiny glass beads or paasi manis. Though made of wood, the murals have the finish of a low relief ceramic work.

Caricaturist

As for the artist, he hails from a village near Kumbakonam and used to draw caricatures as a school student. He drew inspiration from the popular illustrator and caricaturist Gopulu. After completing his certificate course in freehand drawing, outline and model drawing, Natanam came to Chennai in search of better prospects. After working as an apprentice with Sagar, he began doing illustrations for magazines, something he does to this day.

Natanam works mostly on wood with metal embellishments. Sometimes, he uses cement and stone. Some of his creations look like enlarged versions of Tanjore paintings. His works have found takers both in India and abroad. Some of his corporate clients include the International Airport Authority, Air India, IDBI, British High Commission, Chennai, Larsen & Toubro and Bharat Petroleum.

LAKSHMI VENKATRAMAN

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2005, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu