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Crafts and collectibles

The sale brings traditional splendour to urban homes



An array of carved rosewood knick-knacks — Photo: K. Ramesh Babu

THERE IS a thread of continuity, which binds Indian craft processes to their origins giving them that incredible timeless flavour. Yet the face of Indian craft has been in a constant state of flux absorbing new arts, design motifs and textures. At the T.T.D. Kalyanamandapam, Himayathnagar where the Andhra Pradesh Handicrafts Development Corporation is hosting the Lepakshi Heritage Collection exhibition, the huge hall is replete with crafts and handlooms of every conceivable colour and texture.

The sinuous folds of tussar rub shoulders with the wispy chanderis, gajji silk, Mangalgiris and gorgeous gadwals. The smaller items include drawstring bags and beaded and belled thoranams. The range also includes pillow covers, wall hangings with matching beaded tassels and decorative knick-knacks.

Hand embroidered bed-sheets and tablecloths from Palmaner jostle for space with Narayanpet and Chirala sarees, shawls - woven and spun, plain and embroidered vie with mirror-worked cushion and bolster covers and tie and dye and Kalamkari fabrics. The light as air Mysore silks are found choc-a-bloc with khadi salwar sets while those ethnically chic dhokra figurines for your peg table now even come framed. Woodworked altars especially the never out of fashion inlay worked ones, jute bags and holders and handcrafted jewellery made of glass and semi-precious stones in a kaleidoscope of colours are found at every turn.

If you are redecorating your home or moving into a new one, there are plenty of options. You can go passionate over terracotta - there are pieces for the garden, for your interiors and even some for feng shui enthusiasts.

Intricate joss stick holders, framed kalamkari pictures, watercolours, tiles with the famous yellow-blue Jaipur combinations, utility items like wooden spoons and massagers There are tussar weaves and godna paintings, lambadi tribal embroidered furnishings and gift items, and bright bandini pomchas with a shimmer of gold and silver. Also Kondapalli wooden toys and Tanjore paintings find a place.

The exhibition is open between 10. a.m. and 9 p.m. till January 20. Here's your chance to bring a little of our diverse culture home and help the artisan help himself.

DEEPA ALEXANDER

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