Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Thursday, Dec 30, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Coimbatore
Published on Mondays & Thursdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Tuning in...

For Raihanah the long journey in the world of film music has just begun


THEY LEARNT to play the guitar together. While one went on to become a world-famous music director, the other waited in the wings seeing her famous brother scale newer heights.

Alla Rakha Rahman's sister Raihanah worked her way to become a music director just like her star brother did.

Starting off with composing jingles, Raihanah has now turned her attention to movies. The similarities don't end there. "We both like the same kind of music. We also work the same way. I do all my studio work in the night, just like him. But I can't help it. Can I?"

But Raihanah is quick to add that she is not copying AR. "I want to give music that I feel is good. I want to be a trendsetter in my own way." In town to take part in a music programme organised by Lions Club of Coimbatore Saicity and Lions Club of Coimbatore Sakthi, Raihanah narrates her musical journey in a freewheeling talk with Metroplus.

Though she hails from a family of musicians, she did not take to music seriously from a young age. "I learnt music from world famous pianist Handel Manuel, but stopped after sometime. AR graduated to the keyboard, and from then on, he was fully into music. I started my innings after a long gap. In a way it is a re-learning experience."

Being Rahman's sister brings with it a whole lot of expectations and invariably comparisons (her debut film Machi is a case in point). But she is one who doesn't try to live down the image of being AR's sister. "Composing is a fantastic experience. But, unless you are successful, you will not be recognised. However, you cannot compare me with AR. He has vast experience," she points out.

Does she get any advice from Rahman? "He gave me some good ideas and explained the nitty-gritty of film music. After that I realised that, as a beginner, I have to give whatever the director wants." And, Rahman's help doesn't stop with advice. He also helped her set up a studio (Malaka Digi) in Chennai.

Raihanah is among the few women music directors in the industry and knows the challenges that are in store. "Every project is virtually a struggle. You have to keep knocking on doors to get offers. Convincing people is a lot difficult," she says.

She is now scoring music for a couple of untitled movies. So, what does she want to achieve? "I did not start off wanting to become a music director. Now that I have become one, I want to do my job well and make a mark," she says, smiling.

M. ALLIRAJAN

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu