Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Dec 27, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Bangalore
Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Decorative designs

Yuriko Lochan is more evocative in her smaller, monochromatic works



Yuriko's paintings are meticulously executed and skilfully rendered.

OSAKA-BORN Yuriko Lochan had her art education in Kyoto City University of Arts, Japan. She has made India her home for more than 15 years. Expectedly, her unique experiences and encounters in her adopted country have helped transform some traditional concepts and motifs on to the images. "Yuriko Lochan is a sensitive landscapist," writes Ella Datta. "Her encounters with the overwhelming beauties of nature are absorbed, mulled over and then turned into sublime images."

Yuriko's paintings are meticulously executed and skilfully rendered. They have a gentle allure and graceful association. A warm tone and pleasant feel are discernible in the stylised renderings of natural scenes, be they the undulating mountains, placid lakes or swirling waves. Celestial objects such as the sun, the stars, and in particular, the different phases of the moon seem to have a special attraction to the artist, who also suffuses her paintings with soft symbols such as the lotus buds, lean stalks and expansive leaves.

Despite the skill and competence, Yuriko's works also betray an excessive dependence on decorative embellishments. Persistent use of pleasant colours and charming symbols cause a sort of monotony in several works. The lines — which move smoothly to delineate amiable forms, patterns and designs only — seem to enhance the effect of ornamentation.

Repetitive

One also detects repetitiveness in form and theme. Structurally too, the use of diptych or triptych format in every one of her paintings tends to put a restrictive load on some works. All these often suppress the possibilities of creating a meaningful visual statement and become the cause for no more than a sweet monologue.

Contrastingly, Yuriko's smaller, monochromatic works seem to be more evocative, thanks to the deft handling of strokes and free use of space.

Yuriko's solo exhibition, The World, currently on at the Time and Space Gallery, concludes today.

ATHREYA

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu