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Artistic take on myth

Artist Milon Mukherjee's sensibilities are grounded in everyday life. A review of his first show in the city



A fresh representation of Indian myths: Milon Mukherjee with his works. — Pic. by N. Balaji

HAVING STUDIED art at the Government College of Arts, Calcutta, and worked as an artist/illustrator for The Times of India, Milon Mukherjee has since moved on to more personal expressions of his artistic abilities.

His creativity is not confined to any one aspect of the arts but dwells in many of its entities such as in music, theatre and the written word, besides visual art. Well travelled and widely shown, this is the Mumbai-based artist's first show in Chennai, but in his words "his third and final take on the theme of the deities of Hindu mythology."

Lighter interpretation

His is a lighter interpretation of what has always been sacrosanct, a more entertaining view of the stories that have been handed down through time. The texts of these stories are not rigidly adhered to, but rather in the true spirit of the Indian tradition of verbal narration, allowed to take on slightly newer representations with each telling. These stories have been internalised and reinterpreted with deviously witty undertones, bereft of the politicisation that is the essence of contemporary usage. However, he is not an artist for whom fiction takes precedence over fact.

His sensibilities are grounded in the everyday life that surrounds him, mindful of the pains that plague those around him. It is probably this that calls for the creation of the `fantasy' where all things take on an impish bent.

The divinities, Krishna and Ganesha, each playful in spirit and appearance respectively, are in some instances almost interchangeable, a definite deviation from the accepted texts. Their humanisation is explicit as they exist together in our world, enjoying life's pleasures and surrounded by the gopikas so essential to the stories of Krishna. Sorrow is tackled through the loss of colour and the third dimension when portraying the Krishna's departure from the idyllic countryside that he called home.

Created by the confident line and audacious colours that interact with space, Milon's figures are strong yet flighty, as if moving within his lyrical narrative. Storytelling is his speciality and the mythological themes effortlessly find their place within this frame.

The exhibition of Milon Mukherjee's paintings is on for a month from December 20, at Studio Palazzo, 9, Seethammal Road, Alwarpet.

SWAPNA SATHISH

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