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`Drawing' memories



Adinarayana with his paintings. - Photo: C.V. Subrahmanyam

His paintings reflect the travails and simplicity of the common man, especially the fisher folk, whom he had met during his sojourns as a gypsy. The use of vibrant colours, clarity of thought, eye for minute detail, and the refreshingly different approach from the titillating paintings, which are so common these days, come as a breath of fresh air.

They are the paintings of Adinarayana, a faculty member in the Department of Fine Arts, Andhra University, who is a well-known gypsy, writer and a self-taught painter. He displayed 29 of his works at a three-day solo exhibition organised in the university recently.

His paintings mostly dwell on the fisher folk, rural poor and the countryside. A fisherman at work, a fisher folk walking on the beach, a girl in deep thought with her palms across her chest and a salt seller with his cart load of salt going along the beach are some of the paintings which caught the attention of visitors.

A common feature of his paintings is the crow. But why crow? "Crows are known as the scavengers of the sky and play an important role in nature. A peacock is beautiful but its cry is wild and disgusting. When a person invokes the blessings of his forefathers by performing the last rites, he beckons a crow and not a peacock," says Mr. Adinarayana.

But unfortunately the same crow is not treated well by man. Drawing an analogy with human beings, he says, "The same is the case with the poor and downtrodden who render invaluable services but are neglected by the affluent sections of society," he says.

The gypsy got a break from his travelling in 1998. "I had used my free time to write books. Those whom I had met during the tours haunted me in my dreams asking me when I would visit them again. I had mostly toured the coastal areas and I also belong to it. It is but natural that my paintings reflect coastal life," he says.

"My thoughts which I was not able to pen have taken the shape of my paintings. An artist should know which medium is best to give wings to his thoughts," he feels.

Adinarayana plans to release his fourth book 'Stree yatrikulu', which draws from the experiences of women travellers who went globetrotting, in February 2005.

B.M.G.

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