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Spirited colours

Folk arts have been a strong influence on the works of Baniprosonno



The artist uses the small format to mark out intriguing situations.

HE USES colours and lines with pure abandon. Born in Calcutta but settled in Shimla, Baniprosonno acknowledges the influence of folk and tribal art on his paintings. "Since my childhood, I have been taken by the sheer variety of form and content in native arts. The way a tribal or folk artist looks at nature, assimilates the experience, and transforms it in his work is simply amazing. Free from any academic limitations and restrictions, the artist allows the strength of colours, lines and moods to capture the very essence of nature. It is a sheer delight to see, for instance, a gigantic elephant or an elusive owl interpreted so beautifully through simple but spontaneous lines and colours," he says.

Many shows

The 72-year-old artist has held several one-man shows in Kolkatta, New Delhi, Mumbai, Katmandu, Paris, London, Berlin, Amsterdam, Oslo, Stockholm and other places. He has been invited to showcase his works by Commonwealth Institute (London), Kulturhuset (Stockholm), Sonja Henie Art Centre (Norway), Nordjyllands Kunstmuseum Alborg (Denmark), Kulruamt Kiel, La Pasio Olesa (Barcelona) and other well-known institutions.

He conducts workshops for both children and grown-ups in creative paper cutting, wrap rocks, and lamp making.

In his first solo in Bangalore (currently on at the Chitrakala Parishat), the artist has put on display a set of acrylic works on paper.

The bigger works are squarish in construct and incorporate human and animal forms. The stark colours and sturdy lines combine to provide the paintings an expressive feel. One can see figures in isolation as also in interaction with other figures.

The background and ambiance is filled with natural settings, often in a non-literal sense.

The paintings gain their force through spirited delineation as well as their strong structural arrangement.

A colourful peacock, seen against deep blue background, a smiling monkey amidst thick foliage, a man seemingly in conversation with an avian, dancing nudes, and flirting couples are all filled with lively colours and imagination.

Smaller works

Baniprosonno, who shows a particular liking to drawing and sketching, demonstrates his skill in smaller works as well.

These monochromatic works are highlighted by brisk lines and snatches which deftly enclose the light brown tones with power and poise.

It is interesting to see how the artist uses the small format to mark out intriguing situations with free yet controlled strokes.

(The exhibition concludes this evening at the Chitrakala Parishat.)

ATHREYA

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