Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Saturday, Dec 04, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Chennai
Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Madurai    Mangalore    Tiruchirapalli    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Portraits of a vibrant culture

Movement appears as a recurrent motif in Annu Naik's works, which capture a vibrant culture


"PEOPLE INSPIRE me, the human figure stimulates me," is how Delhi-based artist Annu Naik describes the theme of her paintings. Drenched in luminous hues, her canvases reflect the landscape, vibrant costumes and ethnic environment of rural India. Repeated visits to the famed Pushkar Mela in Rajasthan have caused her to revel in the bright colours that the locals adopt in their attire, as contrasted with the arid desert setting.

Rarely do Annu's figures exist in isolation, for interesting groupings of forms are her norm. She speaks of treating the human body as a language, using gesture and pose to tell her stories with figures. Her scenes are drawn from everyday life, referring of interaction among people and representing the lives they lead. Movement appears as a recurrent motif, frequently visualised as fluttering drapery or as young girls on swings bracing themselves against the wind.

Loose brush strokes

Her most recent works on show are appealing in their use of indeterminate spaces and looser brush strokes. The structural framework that until now tightly bound Annu's compositions has come undone to allow the viewer space within the frame. Breaking away from the confines of literal expression, where the artist dictates what is to be seen and believed, she now explores ambiguity. Stories continue to exist but they are no longer the artist's own, they belong to the viewer as well.

The theme is open to interpretation and allows the spectator to pursue a dialogue with the work of art. `If Wishes were Horses' entices the viewer with the image of the bitten apple in the foreground and then teases one's understanding of the picture with the androgynous figure that holds the forbidden fruit. The exhibition of paintings is on till December 9 at the Apparao Galleries, Wallace Gardens, Third Street, Nungambakkam.

SWAPNA SATHISH

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Madurai    Mangalore    Tiruchirapalli    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu