Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Saturday, Nov 27, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Bangalore
Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Madurai    Mangalore    Tiruchirapalli    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Right art

The show hoped to make human rights a household concept



The show had on display the works of some of the best artists of Bangalore.

THE WEEK-LONG exhibition of paintings organised by SIACHREM (South India Cell for Human Rights Education and Monitoring), which concluded at Welcom Art Gallery, Windsor Sheraton Hotel recently, presented an interesting set of works by well-known artists of the City. Brought together for a common cause of "making human rights a household concept", the event sought to blend the significance of the theme with solemnity of the artists' brushstroke.

Stark reality

With a striking and evocative visual ingrained on paper, Yusuf Arakkal's Conflict Children was a fine attempt to portray a piece of stark black-and-white reality through a computer graphic. C.F. John — who felt that "we survive as a family of parasites, surviving on each other's rights" — uncovered an arresting composition, Body Borderlines, using natural fibre and acrylic on canvas. Titled Tiger's Dream and Dream Carpet, Chandranath Acharya's twin canvases, each four feet-by-four feet, were awash not only with colours, but also intrigue.

P.S. Kumar showed his flair by delineating a cluster of emotive yet colourful illustrations, while Bhaskar Rao showed his fascination for puppetry in his multi-hued canvases. S.G. Vasudev, Shankar Kendale, M.B. Patil and J.M.S. Mani located their female protagonists in divergent milieu.

Among other eye-catching works on display were Babu Eshwar Prasad's acrylic paintings gently revealing nuggets of hidden secrets, Venugopal's perceptive urbanscapes, Jasu Rawal's tender still life studies, Rekha Rao's lively Festival, M.S. Murthy's meditative shades, Madhuri Bhaduri's expansive Seascape, Milind Nayak's tranquil Pool, and Ravikumar Kashi's oil and acrylic with a mocking, tongue-in-cheek title, Indians Don't Kiss.

The context

M. Shantamani, who put on display a daring mixed media work, seemed to place the whole event in context, by saying: "Human rights are universal... No man-made barrier of race, colour, caste or creed can possibly alienate a human being from his/her rights. It is in celebration of human rights that we contribute our work of art to SICHREM, in the hope that many underprivileged people might regain their lost rights."

ATHREYA

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Delhi    Hyderabad    Madurai    Mangalore    Tiruchirapalli    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu