Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Nov 15, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Chennai
Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Skills from the North East

Traditional crafts from the North East are showcased at an exhibition in the city



Cane and bamboo dominate the exhibition at Sankara Hall. — Pics. by K. Pichumani

THE VIBRANT craft traditions of the North East manifest in the various products on display at a crafts fair, which has been organised by the North Eastern Handicrafts and Handlooms Development Corporation Limited at Sri Sankara Hall.

Cane and bamboo crafts dominate the exhibition and practically every tribe in this region is involved in such crafts as bamboo root carvings and silk weaving.

At the fair, the images of various gods and goddesses in bamboo stands out. Cane and bamboo baskets, trays, kitchenware, planters, picnic baskets, handbags and door and window curtains at affordable prices, beckon attention. Winnowing fans and sieves in varied shapes make handy kitchen gadgets.

Ideal for your homes

Bamboo Japi's from Nagaland and tribal spears can make pretty decorative items for your homes. The Sitalpith grass products — meditation mats, tea coasters — from Assam are sturdy and used widely as wall decorations and for false roofing.

In the furniture section, ethnically designed modas, centre tables, apple stools, dustbins, swings, dining tables and sofa sets stand out for their simplicity.


The North Eastern States (Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Tripura) share a textile weaving tradition that is unique to this region.

The silk range

The intricate motifs on muga and mulberry silk from Assam come in subtle hues. From Mizoram come the traditional skirts and tops, with ethnic weaves. Dupatta and salwar materials from Manipur and Tripura too stand out for their weaves and motifs.

The kauna (water reed) mats from Manipur are said to be long lasting and make smart statements.

Dry flowers from Nagaland are priced between Rs. 5 and Rs. 10 each. A 10 per cent discount on handicrafts and 20 per cent on handlooms textiles is being offered. The exhibition is on till November 24, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Sri Sankara Hall, T.T.K. Road.

A. CHITHRAA DEEPA

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Hyderabad    Kochi   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu