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Impressions of society

T.C. Rajan expresses his angst on canvas



Reflections of the artist's world.

That writers and painters draw inspiration from contemporary issues is well known. Whether it be the increasing cases of crime against women or the breakdown in family ties, these issues find expression on paper and canvas.

Variety of paintings

`Family Court', one of the paintings in oil at an exhibition of T.C. Rajan's works in the city portrays the anguish of a family torn apart. There are many such surrealistic paintings and some realistic ones too. The boy in a beach (untitled) is quite different from all these.

`Laments of Childhood' was done when the artist was disturbed by the news of a woman selling her own children. "I painted `After War' and `Exodus' after the war in Iraq. They speak about the futility of the whole exercise." Even destruction of forests finds expression on Rajan's canvas. `Hot Bricks' is one such work. A majority of the works are untitled, leaving it to the imagination of the viewers, one guesses.

A self-taught artist, Rajan says that he has no role model. "Even though my father did not know much about painting, he could point out what was wrong." A former basketball player, Rajan had represented Kerala. He is an employee with Indian Space Research Organisation at Thumba.

"For some time I did not paint. Basketball took all my attention," says the artist who studied at the G.V. Raja Sport School here. "It was much later that I returned to the canvas." Although he uses acrylic and oil, Rajan says: "I love to work in oil than any other medium." He is at ease with surrealistic expressions, his creativity is profoundly expressed in his realistic paintings of the `Girl with a pot or the cattle grazing on a lush green riverbanks.'

He claims that he started painting at the age of two.

Sketches

Sketches in Indian ink also depict pain and sorrow and these sketches have a special style of his own, claims the artist. The painting of the Padmanabhaswami Temple is different in the sense that it is not the usual view of the temple that one gets to see in photographs. The details of the corridors along the bathing ghats too are given in detail. Over the years, Rajan has held solo exhibitions and also participated in group exhibitions in Thiruvananthapuram and Bangalore. A few of his paintings have found a place in personal collections abroad. On show at the Museum auditorium are 20 of his paintings and an equal number of sketches.

BIMAL SIVAJI

Photo: S. Gopakumar

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