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MASTER blender

R. KRISHNAMOORTHY takes note of `Sujatha' Rangarajan's words on print media.


AT SIXTY plus, he is still known for his youthful zest. Five decades ago, his first story created waves in literary circles. A decade later in 1962, his series in `Kumutham' titled `Idathu Oram' generated the same magic. In 2004, he continues to ride the crest of success.

Quite expectedly, students of Computer Science Department of the Bishop Heber College, waited for none other than Sujatha Rangarajan to unfold himself at the `Boot Fete 2K4', a State-level technical symposium, organised by the department.

It was the writer's second visit to the college in 20 years and his smiling face revealed his happy mood.

It didn't take him long to unveil his literary manifestations to the students. The uniqueness and variety in his writing, which unfailingly received a wide audience, always helped him retain the status of a `multi-media' writer.

Sujatha's literary works include fiction (short stories, novels, drama) in different categories like social, thriller, science, besides poems. He is also known for science fiction stories in Tamil authored by him.

Popularising science

Recipient of the National Council for Science and Technology Award in 1993, Sujatha's endeavour is to always make people familiar with science by using the public media like books, magazines or the television. The master blender of literature with science, Sujatha has also written stories for multi-media educational CD ROMs and guides the upcoming breed of writers to develop the art of good writing.

Waning interest in literature is what he regrets today.

He is equally concerned about newspapers failing to provide space to stories nowadays.

Though he blames the TV serials, Sujatha, however, does not feel threatened.

"My approach is to emphasise the importance of written word and allow it to fill up all the space that is left by the visual media. I have been fairly successful in keeping the importance of literature aloft," he told his audience.

Grudging the diminishing objectivity particularly in the telecast of news on various satellite channels, Sujatha said, this could best be countered by the print media with its objective reporting.

And cinema? Given his association with the cine industry as a script-writer, pat came the reply: "It will come a full circle."

`Onus on media'

"It is true that there is no synchronization between the location, costumes, dialogues, etc. But then there are good movies too, which go unnoticed. The onus is again on the media. If they project good movies in positive light, the transformation of the cine industry can be expedited," was the ever popular author's parting shot.

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