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Portraying reality

"Art for Concern," the annual exhibition of paintings organised by Concern India Foundation, brings together artists for a cause



Slices of life: Some of Ilango's paintings, which are up for auction. — Pics by K. V. Srinivasan

WORKING ON the dual aspect of raising funds and promoting aspiring artists is "Art for Concern," the annual exhibition of paintings organised by Concern India Foundation. A non-profit, public charitable trust, Concern India Foundation (CIF) supports development-oriented organisations working for the underprivileged by providing financial and non-financial support. "Our aim is to make every disadvantaged individual self-reliant, creating a society of independent people living with dignity," says Suhasa Rau, branch manager, CIF Chennai.

With a mix of talent and style from both tutored and self-taught artists, professionals and art students, the show aims at affordability and saleability in keeping with the fund-raising goal.

Affordable art

Curated by artist A.V. Ilango and including some paintings by senior and established names, the exhibition is predominantly a platform for up and coming artists. The main thrust of the works is on naturalistic portrayal with a few abstractions featured. Still life studies and landscapes in varied media from oils to acrylics and watercolours are worked in individual styles.

The range of themes may be exemplified by Rajny Krishnan's `Flower Sellers' series that is a personification of urban reality, T. Mariya's paintings dealing with surreal mindscapes and B. Swapna Reddy's textured tantric visualisations.

Rural landscapes

Animal forms emerge from the human faces in M. Raja's pastels while the structure of the village carefully dissipates in the paintings by Sandhya Gopinath.

In the works of GoEun Choi, a Korean national in Chennai, responses to the city's traffic mayhem and the water crisis are visualised.

Inaugurated with an auction of paintings by Thotta Tharani and A.V. Ilango, 50 per cent of sales proceeds is earmarked for a cause. The show is on till October 19, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., at Amethyst, Sundar Mahal, Jeypore Colony, Gopalapuram.

SWAPNA SATHISH

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