Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Wednesday, Oct 13, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Bangalore
Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Hyderabad   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

The mind's twisted corridors

The works of Sigmund Freud and C.G. Jung were a great influence on the Surrealists



Lobster Telephone by the Surrealist master, Salvador Dali

THE SYMBOLIST movement was a precursor to Surrealism, Art Noveau and Les Nabis. Surrealism, like symbolism, mines the dream world and is marked by a fantastic visual style where the twisted corridors of the mind are used as the template. The Surrealist Movement flourished between the two World Wars in Europe.

Anarchy and chaos

Nothing comes from nothing, as Julie Andrews wisely observed in The Sound of Music. So Surrealism grew out of the anarchy of the Dada Movement and worked as a perfect counterpoint to the formalistic Cubist movement. At the end of World War I, Tristan Tzara started the Dada movement, which defined itself as anti-art and deliberately defied reason. Tzara felt a society that created war had no right to beauty or art.

The founder of Surrealism, Andre Breton, was a French doctor who served in the trenches during WWI. Originally a Dadaist, Breton started the movement in 1924 with an emphasis not on Dadaist negation but on positive expression.

In writing

Breton wrote three manifestos of Surrealism (1924, 1930 and 1934) where he described Surrealism "as a means of reuniting conscious and unconscious realms of experience so completely that the world of dream and fantasy would be joined to the everyday rational world in an absolute reality, a surreality."

Like in Symbolism, the works of Sigmund Freud and C.G. Jung played an important role with Surrealists. Salvador Dali was one of the most important artists of the Surrealist movement with his emphasis on freezing dreams on canvas. Pablo Picasso stood at the opposing end of the spectrum — rejecting the craft and revelling in the primitive as a basis for art. Two masters, two opposing theories and a century of great art!

MINI ANTHIKAD-CHHIBBER

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Hyderabad   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu