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Bronze wonders

Photo: C.V. Subrahmanyam

C.S.N. Patnaik with his bronze 'Nayika' on display at Chitrangan Gallery .

The intimacy of man-woman relationships has been immortalised in bronze by the eminent sculptor, C.S.N. Patnaik. Some of his works are on display at the Chintrangan Art Gallery at the Hawa Mahal on Beach Road.

His work titled, `Relaxation' depicts a man resting in the lap of a woman. "It is only a woman who could provide the much-needed relaxation to a man, whether he is rich, poor or even a beggar," he says. It is made of a single cast bronze.

His `Nayika' series portrays women as a leader. He captures even minute details like the wrinkles on the forehead and folds on the cheeks. He gives a four-dimensional effect to his sculptures. He brought out a book on `C.S.N. Patnaik - Bronze Sculptures' in which he explains the different techniques of making bronze statues.

The Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief of the Eastern Naval Command, O.P. Bansal, released the book at the inaugural of the exhibition on Wednesday last.

"I had put my 50 years of experience in making bronze statues in the book. I am basically a teacher and I do not want my knowledge to end with me," the octogenarian sculptor told THE HINDU.

There are a number of painters but sculptors, especially those who etch in bronze, are fewer. This is because painters can work individually and obtain quick results and recognition. Sculptures, on the other hand, are laborious, and it takes a lot of time for a sculptor to establish himself/herself.

Treatment of bronze statues with nitric acid and heating them results in the statues taking different colours and textures. The process, more importantly, gives the statues strength and prevents them from being affected by the vagaries of nature for at least a century, says Mr. Patnaik.

He extensively toured various States in the country to study the Maurya, Sunga and Kushan dynasties as part of his research on bronze structures, which was funded by the University Grants Commission. He also plans to publish another book on his drawings, paintings and sculpture in future.

The exhibition will conclude on Tuesday.

B. MADHU GOPAL

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