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Clay world this...

She expresses her worldview through the good earth. Ceramic works by Trupti Patel are on display at the British Council this week.


HAVE YOU ever seen a rhythmic flow in a vessel? Or a lyrical surge in a work of art inspired by riot and gore? Could you manage to locate splendour in rather dull shades of earth, brown or bronze? Or discover a mystic feeling replete with allegory and symbolism in apparently just a container or a saucer? You may have, but only if you were in love with canvases of a seasoned painter or an avid reader of the likes of Chaucer. But here at the British Council in New Delhi this week, Vadodara-based Trupti Patel's ceramic creations defined in vessels and sculptures gave one the same experience. Be it her `Moonlit mango orchard holding the night', a group of 41 vessels, sculptures such as `Nurture of an egg, a tree and her, Pedestal/ Threshold' or any other creations put on display.

A sustained passion

A student of the Royal College of Art, London, Trupti's love affair with clay modelling and ceramic works began when she was a student at Vadodara in the early 1980s, a place where her teachers refused to cooperate with her over the medium, rejecting it as "not a finer material for sculpture". But she sustained her passion.


"I used to bring those heavy works to Lalit Kala Akademi to be enrolled for the National Award." In vain. It was only after she got a scholarship to be a part of RCA that she felt she had the freedom to express her works in ceramic "without any prejudices".

Back home after four years, Trupti now can see the change in people's attitude towards ceramic works.

"I am happy it is gaining ground as a work of art rather than being labelled as just pots and plates," says a satisfied Trupti who has displayed her first solo show at the British Council. Her next venture on "site specific works" is what she is working on these days. One can see her works of art at the Council till October 29.

RANA SIDDIQUI

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