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Mini is back



Mini Mathur now anchors a reality show — Photo: R.V. Moorthy

MINI MATHUR, the chatterbox of Indian television, is back after a long sabbatical. "I was in the family way. Now with son Vivan turning one, I decided to return and Indian Idol provided the perfect opportunity. I wanted to move beyond the MTV image and the reality show allowed me to experiment with my style," she says.

Right now she is busy helping hubby, also a filmmaker, Kabir Khan, in his international project. "It is going to be an Indo-U.S. production to be shot mostly in Afghanistan with the theme focussing on the contemporary problems in the region. Arshad Warsi and Naseeruddin Shah have been signed and talks are on with a leading Hollywood actress," says Mini.

Talking about Indian Idol, Mini says it was not difficult to be a co-anchor with Aman Verma as she has come through the world of Cyrus Broacha and Cyrus Sahukar. "The only difference was in MTV we were allowed to be ourselves. Here we were dealing with talented young singers so we had to me more discreet."

Rude judges

She admits the judges are going to be bit a rude with the contestants but adds: "It is being done keeping in mind Indian sensibilities. I know what happened to Kamzor Kadi Kaun in India."

Mini who herself came through a talent hunt by MTV feels times have changed. "Now there is too much crowd with talent hunts going to smaller towns as well. And there is increasing aspiration to see oneself on television."

However, she refuses to accept there is something wrong in making money out of real emotions particularly when it comes to young losers.

"Over the selection process we become their friends. They share their joys and sorrows with us and the same is captured on camera. Nothing is forced. Here we are looking for a charmer who can hold the audience with his voice. He may not have a classical training in music but he should have the magic, what we call X-factor, to make the listeners move with him, sing with him," she says.

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