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Pure for sure



Raseel Gujaral.

WE KNOW Paradox One houses world-class interiors. We believe in interior designer Raseel Gujaral's gene pool and her ingenuity, so what's the latest paradox about? "It is about making others believe what we believe in. We are not traders. We don't follow trends. But yes, the world is turning towards glass, ceramics and lacquer. So we have added some accessories to go with furniture designed by me," says Raseel. Talk of minimalist trends in furniture with Raseel and she calls her work contemporary and maximalist. "See minimalist amounts to absolutely pure forms something that happens in Japanese art. Let's say a wooden table and a chair. Here forms are pure but I have added some opulence in different forms like a layered top on the dining table." She terms the add-ons as live art because they pervade in our environment. "It is applied art because they reflect your inner sense of style."

Her husband and business partner Naveen Ansal adds, "For furniture we source our material from India only but for accessories since we believe in glass, ceramics and rugs the material is not that good in India, we have imported all of them." There are gold and copper glazed vases and platinum candle stands or for that matter lamp shades to catch your attention. Innovation in shapes and cuts really make usual products unusually unpredictable. "We have tried to make sure that these add on go with our furniture but if the customer wishes he can use them as separates," says Ansal.

However, price points catch too much attention. For instance a jute seat attack costs Rs.32000 and candle stand comes for Rs.14000. According to Raseel price points do not matter as long as you have an eye for art. "We are just establishing some benchmarks. One can get these designs made with cheaper stuff as well. And with exposure to lifestyle products through media, younger generation is comfortable spending on them."

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