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Unblinking lens

Five pictures of K.S. Srinivas will go into the archives of a Dutch institute



Srinivas's studio in Bangalore is said to be the only one that does black and white prints

IF YOU'RE a photographer, your hands itch for a camera every time you see something picturesque. Or when the play of light is just so breathtaking that letting that opportunity go without taking a picture would actually hurt for days. K.S. Srinivas is one such man. And in recognition of his achievements in art photography, The International Federation of Photographic Art, Holland, has chosen five of his photographs to be archived with them permanently.

No training

"It's not a easy feat to get this award because people from all over the world apply," Srinivas says. Moreover, he doesn't have the backing of a formal training on photography either. He has been involved in commercial photography, and his studio in K.R. Puram is the only one in Bangalore that does black-and-white prints. For someone besotted with capturing the essence of the real world, isn't commercial photography a dissatisfying compromise? "I earn through commercial photography and spend it on art photography!" Srinivas says with a laugh.


The subject in the five photos that are Srinivas's claim to fame is light: "I don't think it's necessary for humans or nature to be there in every picture. Often, the play of light creates fantastic images in a fraction of a second." This kind of mood photography is called "pictorial", where the artiste tries to emulate the textures of a painting through photography. And since Srinivas also dabbles in some paint on canvas (literally), he occasionally tries to crossover the two media.

The award from Holland is his first international break, but Srinivas has won more than 10 national awards and has even served as the Secretary in Youth Photograph Society, Bangalore.

Recognition

About photographers craving for international awards, he says: "National awards can give you recognition, but none of provide any financial benefits. And photography is a costly hobby. So whatever you win, you just put them as a string of credentials near your name, feel happy that someone appreciated your efforts, and then just get on with your work. As long as your eyes are your lenses to the world, and your mind the film roll, you'll keep going no matter what."

Srinivas can be contacted on 9845353058 or 28517332.

ROHINI MOHAN

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