Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Aug 09, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus
Published on Mondays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Tiruchirapalli    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Vaango, saapidingaa

For a while, turn into a Tamilian to satiate your taste buds at the Chettinad food festival at D.V.Manor, says A. Saye Sekhar


SAVOURING Kadalai parupu Vellam Payasam is the best way either to begin or conclude a multi-course dinner. The payasam made with uzhandh parupu (black-gram sans chaff) and the kadalai parupu (Bengal-gram) are the ultimate of the ethnic sweets.

Succulent and spicy serving of Chettinad delicacies started off with a bang at "Springs" in the prestigious D.V.Manor. The maître d'hôtel, Rajesh Berry, with his typical broad smile, ushered in the guests to the exclusive food fiesta.

The waiters, clad in the emblematic white lungis and shirts, with anchu kanduvas, usually adorning Congress leaders, went explaining each one of the items to the savours. The best among them was, of course, the Chettinad chicken, served hot. The lip-smacking dishes melted away in no time in the mouths.

Springs, being a 24-hour buffet restaurant and coffee shop, it's left to the choice of the guests to pick up whatever they wanted. It seemed more a family restaurant, for many a young couple made it to the Manor.


The traditional Chettinad chefs, hailing from a small village, Nedungudi, blended their skills with the tastes to make the dishes more tantalizing. Ulaganathan and Senthil did the "masala magic" to add spice to the authentic Chettinad food carnival in the heart of Vijayawada.

There were, of course, a few north Indian and Chinese dishes like Szechwan noodles, veg. Chow-chow and rasamalai.

But, the guests evinced a keen interest on the traditional Chettinad food.


Begin the course with Kozhi Chettinad soup (chicken soup) or murangakai (drumstick) soup. Move on to salads - green salad, Russian salad or Aloo-chana shat, which are, of course, not Chettinad in nature. Chomp a few pieces of kara bonda or Chicken-75 before going to the main course.

Karuvepalai (curry leaves) sadam with a Thakkali (tomato) rasam dressing is the best combination to eat. Uralai Kodai Milagai (potato capsicum) curry, Vendakai kara kozhambu (Ladies' fingers in spicy gravy), Kathrika chops (brinjal masala) and Mullangi (radish) sambar adorn the vegetarian smorgasbord. The wisps of Masala from Chettinad chicken and Aattukari vellapoondh kozhamu (garlic mutton) rose into the air enticing the guests.

Usilampatti Koli kozhambu, Kongnat koli, Aacchi Meen kozhambu, were other dishes that would be served during the festival that would last till August 15.

If Andhra dishes are spiced up with green or red chillies, Tamilian dishes usually have a lot of garlic. Go and have your grub.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Tiruchirapalli    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright © 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu