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Get high on Thai

A Thai food festival is rare in the city. Check out Taj Residency, currently playing host to one


AN EXERCISE of the jawbone is something that cannot be avoided to pronounce a Thai menu. But who cares as long as the food is lip smacking. Sample the culinary diversity from the land of white elephants at Taj Residency's Paradise Lounge.

Cooked with little or no oil at all, in protein-rich herbs and spices, Thai food is manna for the calorie conscious, and equally delectable for the connoisseur. The cuisine is surprisingly light and comprises a whole repertoire of colourful and tasteful items that are distinct in flavour and unique in taste.

Chef Subodh (from Taj President, Mumbai) has been specially flown in to lend his F&B expertise for the 10-day food festival. Along with him, valuable garden-fresh herbs and other ingredients have been flown in from Thailand for that dash authenticity. And decked up for the occasion is the restaurant with jumbo-sized cutouts of dragons and colourful posters that showcase the vibrant culture of Thailand."Thai cuisine is often understood to be same as Chinese but one needs to understand the two are distinctly different from the other," says chef Subodh. While the Chinese use Soya sauce, Thais use Napla (fish sauce) instead even Thai chillies and ginger are different from those on the other side of the Great Wall.

"Thai curries can be divided on the basis of colour - red and green. And quite surprisingly, the green curries are hotter than the red ones," says assistant banquet manager, Satender Singh. A thick paste of Naprick (reshampatti chillies) goes in the preparation of the green curries. "The use of peanut butter and coconut is prominent and that imparts a delightful flavour to the dishes," adds the Chef.

He recommends Pla phad makam (starters), Tom Yum Koong (soup), Pla Nueng Manao (steamed fish in chilli garlic sauce), Kai phad namun hoy (chicken in Oyster sauce), Man Jiam (potatoes and mushrooms in oyster ginger sauce) with glass noodles or Thai fried rice. Don't forget Tuk Tim Grob as dessert.

That brings us to a time to get high on Thai, so just eat and enjoy. Leave the pronunciation for trained professionals, we would not desire you leave with a twisted tongue. The buffet is on till July 25.

SOUVIK CHOWDHURY

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