Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Jul 19, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus
Published on Mondays & Thursdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Hot and sweet junction

For a Bengali treat, SUMITRA SENAPATY recommends the newly- opened Howrah Junction at Wave, Noida.

BENGALI CUISINE is normally available in Bengali homes. The only place in Delhi for traditional Bengali fare was the Bijuli Grill counter in Dilli Haat, apart from a few attempts in Chittaranjan Park. Now a tiny restaurant called Howrah Junction has suddenly sprung into being in Wave's new food court at Noida's Sector18. Entering the restaurant, you can't help but think of Kolkata, with the famous bridge literally stretching out on the wall beside your table.

Open from eleven to eleven, Howrah Junction is always packed, pretty much with people from the East. And it is so very tiny, that it can just about seat 25 people at a time. Typically, Junction comes across as an `adda' or meeting place after the movies, a place to munch `singara' (Bengali for samosa) and rasogolla, the all-time favourites. The snack menu is pretty extensive, and there is

something very tasty and Bengali about the food. Make it a point to check out the cutlets - there is vegetable, meat, fish and prawn to choose from. Kathi kababs, rolls, momos are some typical Kolkata snacks served at Howrah Junction.

It also offers elaborate thali meals just as you might get to eat at a Bengali home. A typical Bengali lunch or dinner here will comprise rice, dal, tarkari (vegetables) and macher jhol (fish curry). Dimer jhol (egg curry) or mangsher jhol (meat curry) are also ever popular items available at the restaurant, though not daily.

The menu changes frequently and there are `specials' like prawn malai, bhappe ilish (steamed hilsa), shukto and stuffed kachoris.

Hopefully rainy days are ahead. Ask for typical Bengali `rainy day' cuisine - khichidi (a mixture of rice, lentils and vegetables), begun bhaja (fried brinjal slices), dim bhaja (fried eggs) and alu posto (potato fried with poppy seeds), served with tomato and date chutney. Service is fast and the range of prices will suit many.

A Bengali meal or even a snack session can just not be complete without singing the praises of cold mishti doi, rosogolla, kachha golla and sandesh. Bengal is well known for its sweets, and a visitor to a Bengali house will always be offered sweets. The tradition continues at Howrah Junction.

In fact, the mishti doi is mandatory, in case you decide to have a go at the red hot chilly chutney accompanying the momos.

And don't forget to try out luchi, the tiny Bengali puri. Eat it with a potato curry or some channa dal. Khub Bhalo!

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu