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Healthy flavours

It is the coming together of Mediterranean dishes at Upper Deck, an ideal eat-out for couples


THE WARNING: Never stray into Upper Deck without your spouse or sweetheart. If you do, you are sure to feel out-of-place. Positioned as "a romantic dining spot," Upper Deck, the restaurant at Fisherman's Cove, is a habitué of couples who enjoy sharing an intimate dinner in outdoor surroundings. "It is for this reason our seating capacity is limited to 36," says executive chef Mohamed Siddiq.

THE AMBIENCE: Open air. Splashing waves. Crescent moon. Mellow music. Dim lights. Wine Tree with bottles of famous wines from around the world hanging from it. And, adding an exotic touch are the rustic-looking tables and chairs that have been hewn out of coconut wood.

THE USP: "Upper Deck provides a perfect setting to fall in love."

WHAT NOW? Upper Deck is providing the setting for yet another kind of romance. It is witnessing the coming together of Mediterranean dishes like the notes in a melody. And the predominant note is the "olive."

THE FESTIVAL: Viva l'olives. There is no escaping the olives. From start to finish. "Olives symbolise many things. For one, the olive branch is held out to extend peace. But we singled out the idea of longevity that olives stand for. Food prepared with olives is as beneficial as living next door to a doctor," says Vinu Varghese, food and beverage manager, Fisherman's Cove.

THE FIRST-HALF: You may set sail on the Mediterranean's culinary waters with any of half a dozen appetisers. You can tuck into thin slices of smoked salmon topped with Sicilian olives, lemon mustard mayonnaise, extra virgin olive oil and black pepper. Or, if you are looking for a softer option, you may try Cerrvella d'Viterllo. In simple English, it means veal coated with bread crumbs, golden fried and served with provencale olives and extra virgin olive oil.

THE SECOND-HALF: The main course constitutes eight immensely olive-dominated dishes. Here, take two for a sample.

Spiedini Di Pollo: Chicken breast fillet rolled with pimento stuffed olives, pinenuts, parsley and parmesan and grilled on a skewer with onion and bay leaf topped with lemon parsley and extra virgin olive oil.

Gamberoni al Limo: Herb crusted jumbo prawns pan grilled with lemon chilli olive oil and Tunisienne olives.

THE COMMENT: If you are heavily into masalas and consider a dining experience incomplete if your tongue is not seared with hot and spicy food, then you may find these Mediterranean dishes as bland as baby food. But if you relish tasty food that is easy on the stomach and, of course, the taste buds, then read the next paragraph.

THE TIMINGS: From 7.30 p.m. onwards. On till July 4. For more details, call 04114-272304/5/6.

PRINCE FREDERICK

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