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Sensible cinema...



As "Sheen" hits the silver screen this Friday, director Raman Kumar reveals a thing or two about the film on Kashmiri pandits. Photo: V. Sudershan.

ASHOK PANDIT'S Sheen is releasing this Friday and cynics are apprehensive that apart from highlighting the plight of Kashmiri pandits, the film has little to make it commercially viable. But Raman Kumar who has penned the screenplay writes off the criticism. "If you study, 90 per cent of the so-called commercial films are flops while films which try to portray something different have a much better success rate."

Raman asserts that the film has a message and a purpose to bring the issue into limelight. "Government and human right groups should take note of these 4 lakh refugees in their own country."

Raman, best remembered for his realistic tale of a working couple, Saath Saath is working on Sarhad Par scheduled to release this June. "The film is about a prisoner of war played by Sanjay Dutt who loses his memory because of the torture inflicted upon him."

Raman points there is no Pakistan bashing in his film. "There are no war scenes. It is more about the humane angle, how a soldier's family suffers and tries to bring him back to normalcy after the war. Pakistan is only incidental. The story could be told in any part of the world." Paired opposite Sanjay is Tabu, once again as a Punjabi girl and Mahima Choudhary as his sister.

Continuing on Pakistan punching, Raman remarks apart from Border, no film with such theme has succeeded. "Gadar thrived primarily because of the romantic angle."

Of late, Raman is better known for his television days particularly the way he frothed the small screen with the daily soaps starting with Tara and still relevant with two serials on air on DD-1. "Television is best for narrating a novel. In films you can't touch the subtle nuances involved." But is it really happening with commercial pressures impeding the stories? "See, the medium requires this kind of treatment." Playing safe!

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