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The organic way


GANESH AND JAYASHREE Eashwar, directors of the Dubden Healthy Living store at 4A Shahpur Jat, believe it's high time we had an alternative to the foods laced with chemicals we are forced to eat as a result of our polluted environment. The root of the problem is simple: the indiscriminate use of pesticides and fertilizers. The solution is even simpler: to avoid their use. Easier said then done. Many remain sceptical about the alternative, which if the Eashwars are to be believed, is organic food.

Defined as food grown without the use of chemical treatment, organic food is generally costlier. "It might be marginally expensive, but the price difference is justifiable, especially if you go for the unbranded items just as one selects them from a local grocer's shop," counters Eashwar. He thinks the price is acceptable considering there is an assurance of better food.

By talking about better food, he doesn't stake claims to food with more nutrients - even though he thinks so. It simply means that it is safer for consumption, that it is healthier from that point of view. However, the science journal New Scientist corroborates his belief that organic food is more nutritious too. In its March issue, the magazine reveals that organic food has many times more salicylic acid than conventional food, thus ensuring stronger arteries and lesser chances of bowel cancer.

The `organic' couple however agrees that there are few stores that sell such food and that even they have difficulty in finding organic varieties of some items. "We source from all parts of India, apart from companies like Navdaniya. Still, we might not be able to get everything at times. But we have more than 200 items that cover pretty much everything. From cereals to `tadkas' to juices and squashes, and even food items unheard of in Delhi, to itrs we keep organic varieties of just about anything," they say.

Not bad, especially when the store doesn't claim to serve only organic food. It's healthier food they deal with. So, even if a person chooses a whole wheat bread and not one made from organic wheat, over a maida one, it's good for Dubden just as it is good for the person.

S.M.YASIR

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