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High on harmony



Raju Singh... Heady music of "Charas".

`MUSIC CAN give a film the initial kick. After this, only if the film is good enough, both the music and film will flourish. It is a symbiotic relationship.' Indeed it is, and who can deduce it better than music director, Raju Singh, whose first two projects, Paagalpan and Satta, bore the burnt of directorial debacles. "I feel proud when almost every evening some fan demands `Gungunatee Hui' from Satta on FM. I feel that the script didn't demand any songs and Madhur Bhandarkar, (the director) also realised it later."

However, Raju, known for creating the track "Afreen Afreen" out of lyrical strands from Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan is confident that his next venture, Tigmanshu Dhulia's Charas will do well. "I am a great fan of R.D. Burman and by chance, we got two `Hare Ram Hare Krishna' kind of situations in the movie. Javed saheb and I thought this was a great opportunity to prove our mettle as we seldom get such plots these days.

So we did `Yeh Dhuan' with Mahalaxmi who has a husky voice and `Bamb bhole' with Sunidhi Chauhan to render a mature tonality to the song." Raju agrees that these days, technology is casting its shadow over content and melody in music. "I think it has also to do with our surroundings. There is so much noise around that even in songs one finds emotions conveyed through shouting." After successfully combining Javed Akhtar, Alka Yagnik and Hariharan together in "Tum Yaad Aye", Raju failed in a similar attempt recently with "Shayrana" with the same team only Hariharan replaced with equally talented Shankar Mahadevan. " It has more to do with marketing. In `Tum Yaad Aye', the company called it a collection of light ghazals, this time they were not ready to call them even ghazals. How can you find the right buyers if you are not even branding the music correctly? Also, earlier companies used to release some 40-50 thousand cassettes, today with so much free music in circulation courtesy FM channels, companies are hesitant to release even 4-5 thousand at the first go." But Raju gives credit to FM for giving music lovers a chance to listen music. "Everybody was tired of seeing music."

Also credited for creating jingles for serials like Boogie Woogie and recently Jassi Jaissi Koi Nahin, Raju's latest attempt is to make Sahara's magnum opus Sahib Biwi Ghulam, a household name through the theme song. "It is like creating a brand identity for a product. When I made Boogie Woogie's punch line, people said how can you boo your own serial, but see how it caught people's imagination."

With Chot, ready for release after Charas where Raju claims he has recorded a live nautanki, "Chail Bihari" for the first time, one hopes lackadaisical scripts won't hurt his harmony this time.

ANUJ KUMAR

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