Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Apr 19, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus
Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

It's pictorial and plastic

It's an interesting voyage through art and sculpture at the on-going show at Vinyasa


THE INDIAN pictorial and plastic traditions continue to dominate the sensibility of the contemporary artists. Yugal Sharma an artist-academician from Udaipur and Shekhar Vechalekar, a sculptor from Mumbai, are showcasing their works at Vinyasa.

Sharma's referential sources indicate the influence of the canonical pictorial tradition of his region. Working in the traditional mode in terms of technique and themes, Sharma has mediated his concepts through the water-colour medium and has also used earth as well synthetic colours. Inspired by the philosophical sources, particularly Vayupurana, which descriptively lists all the five elements with their symbols and colours, Sharma has employed these motifs directly. His linear style employs line that is extremely delicate and fragile appearing as though it has been breathed upon. The fine delineation of details, particularly the rendering of the leaves within a female form that alludes to earth as well symbolically referencing fecundity, has jewel-like precision. The faces whether male or female are delineated in profile or near profile, while the colours are symbolically used to indicate the element either fire, air or water.


In many respects, the theme of five elements seems to be a direct translation of the verbal into visual. But it is here that Sharma marks a posture of difference wherein he has used surrealistic imagery, for instance, the ubiquitous mythic representation of Kamadhenu is morphed to contain a peacock tail and legs are represented by the peacock heads. The painting of a mermaid, another hybrid imagery, has two peacock heads forming the tail. Says Sharma, "Both the cow and peacock are associated with Krishna" and hence the mermaid playing the flute alludes to this playful imagery of the popular sacred icon.

In addition to the five elements, Sharma has also drawn upon the Ragamala Series popularly known as the musical modes, which is the visual translation of the abstraction of the Indian musical system. The technique, compositional format and deft play of linearity emphasise the skill of the artist, which is neatly complemented by his concepts drawn from Indian philosophical sources.


The figurative works of the sculptor Vechalekar, executed in bronze and aluminium, display characteristic of intimacy and warmth. Titles such as "Ecstasy," "Mother Dear Mother," and "In Memorium" express sentimentality and nostalgia. The artist has simplified the forms to its reductive essentials with minimalist contours, depressions and projections. All the works have an endearing quality perhaps due to their size, which do not go beyond 14". The dull finish of the metal in conjunction with simplified contours enhances the wistfulness in many pieces. "Vrisabh" in aluminium is a playful image of the bovine form with its characteristic hump and raised head.

The show is on at Vinyasa Art Gallery till April 20.

ASHRAFI S. BHAGAT

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu