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Soothing images

Nature and architecture blend harmoniously in K. Balamurali's paintings, lending an air of serenity


THE CANVASES create a haunting sense of the romantic in the picturesque ruins painted in a technique that augments such an aura. The tonalities inscribing these are dominantly monochromatic namely green, blue or brown. A self-taught artist, K. Balamurali is showcasing his works at the ArtWorld till April 15.

The technique through which the artist mediates his sensibility is soft and misty. The brushwork is gently textured and blotched to create an evocative ambience. The colours through subtle tones mask the dominant linearity of architecture that plays hide and seek with dense painterly foliage. The preferred medium for the artist is oil or/and acrylic on canvas.

Nature and architecture blend harmoniously in Balamurali's paintings to spread a blanket of serenity and contemplative feel. There are no discordances; the absence of human figures largely calls attention to and allows focus on Nature and architecture. The works have a soothing and balmy effect ideally suitable to grace the walls of domestic interiors.

The canvases grow on one's sensibilities since no dramatic natural phenomenon intrudes to make them awesomely `sublime' as one would encounter in Turner's paintings. There is neither daring brushwork nor free handling of paint.

Balamurali undeniably has given his themes and technique a commercial mandate. He surrogates an otherwise clinically precise and analytical approach to Nature through juxtaposition with architecture of the Islamic past. The happy cohabiting of these two elements, one natural and the other manmade, strikes a rhythmic self assuring dignity that precipitates in an overarching feeling of poise, marking the centrality to his themes and individuated approach. He distils his sensitivity through the romantic motif of architectural ruins, which make a special appeal to his emotional sensibility.

Says Balamurali, "The ruins and architectural monuments, particularly in and around Delhi, has inspired me to create paintings of this type. I like the leaves and wild creepers as a contrast to the bricks or stones." This statement inscribes his romantic mindset with `picturesqueness' as the dominating motif that haunts his frames.

For the artist then there is no other philosophy than one, which makes an appeal through the senses lending an aura of sensuality. It is the phenomenon manifesting the site of his artistic aspiration and not the noumen.

Because the tactility through texture, the gentle and harmonious blend of foliage and the bold monumentality of architectural delineation leave nothing to imagination. It directly makes an appeal to our senses and hence, the sensual visuality that inscribes his art.

ASHRAFI S. BHAGAT

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