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The chemistry of Masti



SWEAR! IT IS MASTI TIME: Riteish Deshmukh hopes for happy times with "Masti", releasing this April. Photo: Sandeep Saxena.

ONE FLOP, and Ritesh has become Riteish. "No superstitions as such. Just an assistant director insisted, so I changed the spelling for the screen. I am still signing cheques with the old one," asserts Riteish, waiting for Indra Kumar's "Masti" to put his career in control after Vashu Bhagnani's "Out of Control".

"It is a fun film where Vivek, Aftab and I try to break the shackles of matrimony. There are three stories. I am playing a character tormented by his wife and mother-in-law. The other two are facing similar frustration and when they meet, Aftab suggests breaking the monotony through extramarital affairs. And the laugh riot begins."

Riteish assures that "Masti" is different fare from the director known for presenting a hilarious male bonding in "Ishq" . "One, he has not taken us to Ooty for the customary shot with the tree. As for comparisons with `Ishq', it was melodramatic in the second half. `Masti' is like `Ishq' in both the halves. I think he has realised that the days of over-dramatisation are over," he points out, adding it doesn't mean that the film falls in the category of "Dil Chahta Hai" or "Jhankaar Beats" as they were meant for a niche audience. "It will please both the rickshawallahs and the sophisticated lot."

Not afflicted with the image-syndrome, two-film-old Riteish, who played a lover boy in his debut film, "Tujhe Meri Kasam" and a man with two wives in "Out Of Control" believes that it is the age of characters. "Today, Sanjay Dutt answers to Munna Bhai on the streets, and people call Arshad Warsi by the name of Circuit in Dubai because of the characters they played." And this is something that made him accept a smallish role in Bobby Deol's "Bardaasht". "The reason to accept a character which dies by the intermission was that it is a realistic film written by Vikram Bhatt and directed by E. Niwas. I took it as an opportunity to work with a great team and a chance to do a different role - a gullible young man, who falls in with bad company."

Amenable to the fact that he can't carry action flicks on his shoulders, Riteish, an architect by education maintains that these are times of coalition in the film industry as well, where different kinds of actors can survive.

ANUJ KUMAR

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