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Cheerful and fresh

FROM HER earlier exhibition, held last November, Sara Paulose, has travelled in terms of art, a great stroke. Moving on from her initial affair with watercolours, she has forayed into a new medium of acrylic and oil. A natural transition, quite like the colours on her art paper, the move from watercolours to acrylic to oil and clay modelling in the offing, Sara is spreading her wings. The `Keraleeya Kala,' her first with acrylic medium, depicting Kerala arts, is a big canvas. The 8x3 ft of black backdrop with colourful Kathakali, theyyam and other folk and classical art forms in flow, is typecast with the tag of tourism, just as most Kerala landscapes are. They make perfect souvenirs and takeaways of this rain drenched verdant land with a rich cultural heritage.

Done in precisely four hours, the one thing that her mentor and guide, Onyx Paulose emphasises, is the speed at which she completes her work. An indication of her clarity of mind, it comes across more in her watercolours and the pencil and pen sketches. Another nouveau attempt by her is into abstract art in oil. A dioramic watercolour portrait of Mother Teresa, done in 20 minutes, another work in half an hour, are all quick expressions of a driven energy. That her individual creativity is shaped by the larger-than-life guidance of her mentor is perhaps a point to ponder. (The name Sara Paulose evolved from Suhara. She took the name of her guru, Paulose as guru dakshina to him.) But with artistic abilities simmering, can individual expression be far behind? The rickshaw, a work selected by the Lalita Kala Akademi for an award, is a beautiful work in deft brush control.

Among the many mediums that she is trying her skill at, watercolours seem to be her forte. In this medium, she seems to revel in a number of themes, but on small parameters. With a penchant for pastels, she makes a new attempt at intense colours. A certain boldness seems to overtake her in the newer mediums she is dabbling with and though the canvas is large, it is in the process of evolution. The paintings in the on-going exhibition at the Cochin Aquatic Club, Fort Kochi, have negotiable prices and if one catches the heart, it can be within the reach of one's pocket!

PRIYADARSSHINI SHARMA

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