Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Mar 01, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus Hyderabad Published on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Sharing the nuances

The ongoing workshop at the Sarojini Naidu School of Performing Arts, Fine Arts and Communication facilitates interaction and discussion



Giuliano Giussani sculpting on sandstone

SERENE SURROUNDINGS away from the hustle-bustle of the city - perfect for an art workshop... the atmosphere is like a vivid colour palette. The excitement among the students is palpable - they are watching famous names in art paint and sculpt outside their ateliers.

For the students of the Sarojini Naidu School of Performing arts, Fine Arts and Communication, University of Hyderabad, the ongoing art workshop is a boon in terms of knowledge they have gained by observation and interaction.

The art crowd on campus included ex-students of the University and other budding artists (from Goa who are on a visit to the School) as well.

"Atul Dodiya, Fritz Baack (from Germany living in Switzerland) and Giuliano Giussani (Italy) are spending about ten days in the School. They are in the midst of students painting, sculpting, interacting and discussing. They tell them what it is to be an artist - considering the time span they have spent in their profession.

A workshop of this sort also gives students much-needed courage to go ahead in the field," says Shamsunder, head, fine arts.



Atul Dodiya pondering over his work

Students have been watching the artists paint and sculpt and learn the nuances from them.

It is a lesson in cross-culture as well as they get to know the patterns of living and work of the artists from abroad. It's an open atmosphere - there is no rigidity and no barriers.

"It's wonderful as I am able to share the experience and expertise. Students are like a lump of clay - how we mould them is important. We can guide and encourage them and boost their faith. I prefer to be more like a friend and we are in fact a large family. I am glad to see the students' seriousness and eagerness to know things. The advice helps them focus better. I also provoke them to ask questions," says Atul Dodiya.

The School is a beehive of activity - while Guiliano and Fritz are chiselling `abstract' sculptures out of sandstone in the open area, Dodiya is painting in his room.

Sculptures (with some maquettes as well) and paintings in various stages are visible. The discussions help in career prospects as well. "At times some students with potential are identified by such visiting artists and their names are suggested for art camps and other art-related activities," says Shamsunder.



A student's colourful canvases —Photos: Mohd. Yousuf

Some of the budding artists from Goa who came on a visit have been allowed to paint. "It's interesting to be here though one feels it is too short a time. I showed some slides to enable people have an idea of the work I do," says Baack, whose contemporary abstract torso depicting the male and female form is akin to the `ardhanarishwara' concept.

Baack prefers working with hand although it is time consuming. "Machine destroys the creative process at times. When a concept is there, it's ok, but if it's not it's better to work with hands." For Giussani, such a workshop "helps exchange notes, observe each other's style of working as we are from different backgrounds."

Students are having a field day as this workshop also includes slide shows and film screenings (to do with art).

"This workshop has helped in clearing doubts I had," says Bharath, a fourth semester student whose intriguing work draws some kind of comparison between Michelangelo's David and filmstar Hrithik Roshan.

The workshop understandably has been beneficial for all. As one of the faculty members Vaishali Ghosh put it, the scope to learn and practice has been created without the boundaries of a classroom.

RADHIKA RAJAMANI

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu