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Not a tough guy this...



Rahul Dev... On wings of hope with "Agni Pankh". Photo: S. Arneja.

DESPITE BEING the son of an Air Force officer, Rahul Dev was not motivated to join the Defence Services. "He was a righteous man and I saw how an honest officer suffers in life. In saving some children once, he sustained fractures all over his body and for many days we did not know where he was. We faced a lot of mental trauma because of the nature of his job," says Rahul.

But Rahul has definitely inherited his father's love for poetry and displays this love, in enacting the role of a flight lieutenant, Vishal Dev, in debutant director Udey Gupte's film "Agni Pankh". In the film he speaks more in poetry than in prose, and is not an angry young man taking out a gun at the slightest provocation. "I never aspired to look like a tough guy, devoid of emotions," he says.

This model-turned-actor has been seen in various roles, from the film "Champion" to "Asoka" to "88 Antop Hill" to "Footpath" and more.

"I learnt in school that there are nine kinds of rasas. I wanted to play all of them, so I never chose a film that would typecast me," says Rahul, sitting pretty at Jeffery's Restaurant at Ansal Plaza in New Delhi. And his choice of films has won him 12 Zee nominations for "Champion" and one for "Footpath" too.

Rahul who wanted to be a cricketer - he represented Delhi in 1998 - was in a discotheque, when Vivek Khosla offered him "Dus", which never got completed, for Khosla expired before completing the film. His two-and-a-half-years training at Kishore Namit's school of acting in Mumbai with actor Sujit Kumar's son proved to be fruitful, besides modelling assignments he took up during this period. But now the term modelling turns him sour.

"The fashion industry is still developing in India. Earlier for lack of experience we would do one show in three days. Now we do 20 shows in this many days; learning has come a bit late," he philosophises, saying he would not do fashion shows any more and would concentrate on films.

In his kitty he now has films like "Bardasht" by E. Niwas, an English film "Cape Karma" by Pankaj Advani, "Jaane Hoga Kya", "Ghafil" and lots more.

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