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Not just Jeevan's son

In New Delhi to talk about his latest television avatar as Balraj Thakur in the Sahara churn-out, "Zameen Se Aasman Tak," actor Kiran Kumar tells SANGEETA BAROOAH PISHAROTY why after so many years of being on the small and big screens, he is still "a dissatisfied soul."



Kiran Kumar...Exploring new frontiers. Photo: S. Subramanium.

ONE LOOK at actor Kiran Kumar and it leaves you wondering. After all, what was wrong with this man that he did not reach where he could have? Still a handsome face, good height, a strong voice and an appealing personality, this Kumar has been just so right for our very own Bollywood yarns. Acting he has been up to, might not be as compelling as his father Jeevan but much better than so many on today's big screens flaunting their abs more than their performing talent.

But then, he does not belong to this era. In the era that he stepped into the tinsel town, be it as a hero or a villain, perhaps one Amitabh Bachchan was sufficient to shove others from the frame.

"But, I am a happy man. People appreciated my roles in `Tezaab', `Khuda Gawah' and `Radha Ka Sangam.' I did my bit convincingly and got noticed even though as a villain, " says Kumar, lacing it with that familiar smile. Actors, he declares in that admirable voice of steel, are dissatisfied souls, always thirsty for newer roles.

"I have also been a very dissatisfied soul. But I hate to be as stagnant as a lake. I'd rather be a river, always flowing and thus meeting many anchors," he says. Anchors he met many, and many more are to come, with more than five roles in forthcoming films and a handful of television characters to play on many channels, the latest being Aroona Irani's "Zameen Se Aasman Tak" to be aired on Sahara Manoranjan from this Monday.

In New Delhi to talk about his latest small screen action, Kumar details his road map from J.P. Dutta's "LOC Kargil" to other big screen rollouts expected in the coming days: "I will be seen in Sanjeev Puri's `Agneepankh', Rahul Kapur's `Mor', Sanjay Gupta's `Junoon', Smita Thackeray's `Hum Do Hamara Ek', Farokh Siddiqui's `Revati', Priyadarshan's `Kashmakash' and an unnamed film by Raman Kumar." As busy as he can be, his television diary dotted with shooting dates is also quite impressive. From the national broadcaster Doordarshan to private channels, he is almost everywhere.

"Television has come as a boon for me," he admits. In the newest role of Balraj Thakur in "Zameen Se Aasman Tak," he says, he got "creative satisfaction."

"The character I am playing is not a superhuman, but he has the ability to rise above crises in his life. In spite of difficulties, he never gives up," Kumar describes, adding, that such an instinct is in each one of us, and that is where it entwines reality.

This Monday at 10 p.m., many would know what he is talking about.

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