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Reality byte



Aroona Irani... A dash of actual life on TV. Photo: S. Subramanium.

TWO SERIALS at present and both are doing well. So, why not a third one? "That is what exactly I felt," says Aroona Irani, flashing that memorable smirk on her face with that recognizable mole in tow.

In New Delhi this past week to speak about her latest tube tale, "Zameen Se Aasman Tak" to be on the air from this Monday through Thursday at 10. p.m. on Sahara Manoranjan, the lady says she hit upon the idea of this latest soap three years ago after the devastating Bhuj earthquake.

"One day before the life-taking quake happened, I was in Bhuj. The hotel where I stayed turned into rubble the next day. I had a strange feeling and always wanted to do a serial on this line," says this actress-turned-TV producer-director.

The story, she says, revolves around the family of Balraj Thakur (played by Kiran Kumar) after an earthquake hits the place they live in. He loses his wife (played by Aroona herself) and daughter (played by Jividha). After he begins a new life with another woman (played by Sudha Chandran) with the thought that his near ones have been snatched away by the calamity, the dead ones come walking into his life again.

"Be it `Des Mein Nikla Hoga Chand' or `Tum Bin Jaoon Kahan,' I have always done my serials based on the play of relationships. Since people have liked the earlier ones, I hope this one fits the bill too," she says. Taking a bit of liberty with the medium, she inserts Jividha in the saga as a bar dancer, something many would arch their eyebrows about. "The bar dancer is there because there are people who go there to drink. And, they are the people from our society only, so I am not showing anything that is not there amongst us," she reasons. "Besides, we do not mind when classical dancers perform in front of hundreds of people but bar dancers are taboo," she adds.

Well, well, time for the viewers to take over.

SANGEETA BAROOAH PISHAROTY

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