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Expressions in colour

Swathi Jaikumar's paintings are a blend of surrealistic and abstract styles.


ART LOVERS of the serious kind would, perhaps, be familiar with the non-representational forms of expression, which challenged traditional ideas and beliefs about works of art in the West during the 20th century. The works of Swathi Jaikumar, an up-and-coming artist, reflect spirituality and rationalism. His collection of paintings, titled `Kaleidoscope', were exhibited in the city recently.

Swathi is educated both in the traditional and modern techniquesMost of his paintings fascinate the viewer with their vibrant colours. Swathi uses simple images to evoke the desired effects. For example, the image of a bull appears repeatedly in his works. One of the works, `Rishabham', is highlighted in black or red. The `Rishabham' form, rendered in red patches of colour, looks as if it were coming-out of the surface with its typical, yet unique look. Similarly, the simple linear figure of a man absorbed in playing a musical instrument emerges from a space where colours such as greens, blacks, and reds grow wildly - yet rhythmically - around him. "The painting depicts loneliness. To show that the man is lost in his own world, I've used symbols of music and alphabets too. I've used colours liberally as in modern art," explains Swathi. These lone images evoke a sense of placidity. He has been experimenting with surrealism and abstract styles for some time now. "Surrealistic images can be bought to the fore by using bold strokes on the canvas. I love the works of Salvador Dali and make it a point to pore over photographs of his works in books," he says. Swathi draws his inspiration from Dali and wishes to model his works on similar lines.


Swathi's paintings give a sense of déjà vu, produced by the use of a variety of images. For instance, he uses the image of an illuminated bell like human figure with a flame below him spreading a beam of light, reminding us of a yogi. Another image of a bird resembles the covered face of a nun. The artist does not seem to make use of these images deliberately as tools to portray craetivity. These creative experiments of Swathi possess freshness.

SAVITHRI RAJEEVAN

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