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Bringing art home

From adorning the walls of museums and art galleries, paintings have moved to giving interiors an elegant look.


AS THE city becomes less conservative, people too have become conscious about how the interiors of their homes should look. With designers being called upon to lend that `different' look, paintings have begun figuring in the scheme of things.

Paintings are being increasingly used to add that splash of colour to the four walls. "They serve as a relief and can be used to decorate bare walls. They should reflect the taste and mood of the people. For restaurants and shops, paintings should be theme-based. For instance, for a seaside resort, paintings of the sea, sand, beach and boats are apt. Paintings with definite lighting and hung at fixed intervals create a good ambience," says Rajenesh Clement, interior decorator and secretary of the Indian Institute of Interior Designing, Kerala.

"The paintings should be in harmony with the dιcor of the house. The colour, size and shape of the paintings should complement the aesthetics of the room," says architect Jaya Chandran.

"Cool' paintings are more suited to bedrooms, while `bright' paintings can be hung in living rooms," says architect Priya James.

A range of paintings is available in shops in the city. Be it bamboo paintings, or those by well-known painters, all add a touch of finesse to the room.

Bamboo paintings are frequently seen in homes.

"People prefer classical works. Replicas of Ravi Varma paintings and those of Mona Lisa are in demand," says Usha, senior manager at SMSM Institute. The works of the `Prince Painter,' Raja Ravi Varma, are usually based on Hindu epic stories and characters. `The Milkmaid', `Subhadra Haranam', `Hamsa Damayanti', `Mohini', `The Maharashtra Lady' are a few among his masterpieces.

Replicas of famous paintings are available in different shapes and sizes, and at affordable prices. Made on canvas, they seem authentic, and are widely used in interior decoration.

Vegetable paintings too have become fashionable. They are made using natural dyes (extracts from fruits, vegetables, leaves). Episodes from Indian mythology such as Geetopadesha and Kaleeyamardhana are depicted in these paintings.

One can also choose from stone, silk paintings and palm leaf paintings.

Glass paintings have few takers. Used for specific purposes, these are very expensive. Wall painting, a laborious process, and therefore, very expensive, is rarely used for interior decoration in the city.

NIRMALA M. R.

Photo: C. Ratheesh Kumar

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