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Cool Kat

DJ Arris da Kat, who was in the city recently, is a name to reckon with in the London club circles


ARRIS DA Kat lives in an alley between a courthouse and a night club. Do not let your imagination run away with you. Arris da Kat is the nom de guerre of Hardeep Singh Sandhu, a happening DJ in London. Arris da Kat has studied law, but is making waves on the turntable. The lawyer-DJ played soulful and funky house at the Pasha this past weekend. He played tracks by Grand Nelson, Bryan Tippler, DJ Gregory Martin, Solveig, Kyd Crème, Maw and Groove Junkies. Superimposing them, he mixed them with random jingles. There was a lot of vocal elements in Kat's music.

A dead ringer for an Englishman in speech and mannerisms, Arris da Kat is "desi" at heart. His parents hail from Jalandhar and he knows it in his bones that he will marry only an Indian soni kudi. "Indian women are incomparably beautiful," he gushes. His parents, who have given him carte blanche to carve out his own career, often tease him that the hidden agenda of his Indian tour is to find his soni kudi, laughs Kat.

Kat was quick off the block as he started waggling the keys on the turntable at age 12. Today, 12 years on, he is a name to reckon with in London's clubbing circuit. Though DJs and musicians Joey Negro, Mark Knight, Simon Dunmore and CJ Mackintosh whetted his appetite for this music-mixing profession, he was inspired to call himself Arris da Kat by a DJ called Felix the House Cat.

Currently touring India, Kat has already had a taste of the dance music being played in a few cities. "India is putting itself on the dance music map," he says. "In Delhi and Mumbai, you hear a lot of Hindi remixes. But Chennai, Bangalore and Hyderabad accommodate Western influences."

PRINCE FREDERICK

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