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Young artists, distinct style

Works of four young artists from Kolkata are on display at Kalakriti art gallery


INDIAN CONTEMPORARY art is gradually finding acceptance in Hyderabad, with the spate of new galleries that have come up in the city which have provided artists at least exhibition areas, if not a market. Perhaps, in an attempt to understand art, people will start making their own definitions as and when they can get time to be a part of its numerous activitiesAt Kalakriti Art Gallery, four young artists from Kolkata are exhibiting works which represent a distinct variation in medium and style. Sumantro Mukherjee, Soumen Basu, Dipanjan Das and Pradip Muhuri are young artists from the Government College of Art and Craft in Kolkata.

While two of them completed their Bachelors in Visual Arts, the other two are still studying.

Sumantro Mukherjee mounted a study of apes rendered in conte(dry pastel) on paper. Dipanjan Das displayed some eye-catching shipwrecks and the like in tempera whereas Pradip Muhuri has elaborate narratives of an existentialist.

Soumen Basu has installed reliefs in terracotta with highly decorative motifs such as Ganesha, masks and animal forms.

There is no link whatsoever in the content, processes, media or style. While Mukherjee's apes appear like an environmentalist's diary, the artist himself is in the process of studying line and volume, a student's college exercises. Das, on the other hand, holds on to a conventional content and medium and executes scapes that gladden the heart. His deft handling of his medium brings about the aesthetics in his work.

Muhuri, the contemplative, creates impressions of a painterly narrative which is uttered in a progression of black.

The spectators move their gaze in the direction across the canvas on which the artist created the negative space by leaving white blanks on the canvas. The image teases the viewer, as the entire format is a textured endeavour.

The exhibition is on until November 30, between 11 a.m. - 7 p.m.

ATIYA AMJAD

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