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A spicy Oriental cruise

Spice is celebrated at the Thai and Malay Food Fest at The Residency


THOSE WHO wish to introduce their taste buds to saucy and spicy food, it's time you partook of the food at the Chin Chin restaurant at The Residency.

Venue of the ongoing Thai and Malay food fest, spice has been celebrated in the menu.

Right from the starters to the desserts, everything is spicy.

It's not that the restaurant has decided to do away with their regulars to go spicy, but mainly because they wanted to give something different.

"Every year we have been hosting the Oriental Food Festival, but this year we are exclusively into the Thai and Malay cuisine," says the hotel's Corporate Chef, M. Manohar.

About 50 sweet and spicy veggie and non-vegetarian delicacies, including sweets, are on offer at the Thai and Malay Food Festival.

The ingredients that have gone into the dishes include lemon grass, chillies, basil, young ginger, red and green curry paste and a good amount of coconut milk. "They are all authentic ingredients imported from Thailand and Malaysia," he adds.

Under the expert guidance of chefs V David Thapa and Raja, a ten-member team is working for the 11-day fest.


In the soups, Tom Kha, an aromatic Thai coconut cream soup with shredded chicken, prawn and mutton, is a good start.

The lemon grass, lemon leaves, young ginger and tomatoes that have gone into it give it a unique flavour.

In the starters, Satay Gai, marinated chicken grilled on a skewer and served with peanut sauce, was a little on the sweeter side.

"It is grilled with bones to lend it additional flavour, similar to the barbecued variety," says S Ashok Kumar, Executive Chef.

Each of these dishes came with curry pastes and sauce that made the dishes all the more fiery.

The Pla Prik Nung, cooked marinated fish dipped in sauce retained its original flavour. "We will use only Seer Pla (fish) for all our dishes during the festival," says Manohar.

The Khao Phad Gai, Thai fried rice, is one of the most popular items in the menu.

Soft, neatly shredded chicken and scrambled eggs added to its taste. Kaeng Gai, chicken with spicy red curry paste, and Sambal Ayam, diced chicken tossed with a slightly bitter Malaysian sauce, went well with the fried rice.

Mama Megoring, boiled noodles with Sambal sauce, was passable.

A lot of effort has also gone into the desserts, with Khanom Thai, yellow lentil pudding with coconut milk, topping the list.

The festival is on till November 30 from 7.30 p.m. to 11.45 p.m.

M. ALLIRAJAN & RAYAN ROZARIO

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