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SOUND sense

Meet Sinduja and Prakash, who are perhaps the youngest sound engineers in the country


PRAKASH KUMAR is 16 and Sinduja, 17, and already these two have carved out a "sound" career for themselves. They are said to be the youngest sound engineers in the country. Only a year ago, these two teenagers were students of sound engineering at the SAE, and today they are rubbing shoulders with the masters in the field. While Sinduja is working for Cosmic, Prakash freelances.

Though sound engineering is a relatively new element in their lives, these two have grown up with music around them. The lisping opener in the famous song "Chikku Bukku Raile" from the film "Gentleman" was sung by Prakash. He was just four then! And that was not his maiden number - his first song was for a Malayalam film when he was three-and-a-half! Adept at playing the keyboard, Prakash can compose music too and has worked with the likes of A.R. Rahman and Bharadwaj. He has also composed jingles too - HDFC, Bhagavati Jewellers and so on. And "10 to 12 projects are in the offing."

Prakash says he wants to become a music producer. "A music producer is a `music director plus' in that he attends to the sound engineering aspect of music production as well," he explains.


Noticing Sindhuja's aptitude for playing the keyboard, her parents thought she would become a composer. However, when she showed more interest in sound engineering, they were all encouragement.

She has worked with Praveen Mani for the song "Oru Parvai" in the film "Ottran". And she is part of an interesting project at Cosmic - composing music for "mantra therapy" — in which she doubles as a keyboardist.

Despite putting in long hours of work everyday, Sinduja says she enjoys every moment of her fledgling career. Same here, says Prakash.

PRINCE FREDERICK

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