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Where kababs are `produced'

The Great Kabab Factory offers 200 non-vegetarian and a similar number of vegetarian delicacies


IN THE fourteenth century, the belligerent Mongols invaded what was then called Hindukush (the Indian subcontinent). They managed to lord it over the inhabitants of this land for a short while. Then the winds of change swept these daring invaders into the pages of history. But they have left behind something to which people of the Indian subcontinent continue to be slaves - kabab. The extent of this slavery can be gauged from the fact that a restaurant in the city has been named after this Mongolian delicacy - "The Great Kabab Factory" at the Radisson.

Heraldic symbols reminiscent of the nomadic Mongols are nowhere to be seen. Nevertheless, the restaurant lives up to its unusual name. It has been painstakingly made to look like a factory, down to the last detail. The servers are dressed in blue and green dungarees. By dint of their weight and shape, the cutlery resemble factory implements - the ladles are twisted, the spoons are knotted at the ends and the utensils come a stone or two heavier. Cosmetic cutlery - some made in wood and others in metal - adorn the walls.

Even the words have been chipped to mesh with this exotic concept. "We do not `make' kababs, but `produce' them," says executive chef Elango Rajendran. "We have made the kitchen a `see-through' so that you can watch our cooks `produce' an `assembly line' of kababs," he persists with his "factory speak". At The Great Kabab Factory, 200 non-vegetarian kababs and a similar number of vegetarian kababs are "produced". The menu changes from day to day. Here's a day's dinner menu. Non-veggies can start with the time-honoured Galouti Kabab (mince lamb kabab with 120 spices (!) cooked on a typical mahi tawa, served with ulta tawa paratha). That whets your appetite sufficiently for a Tandoori Murgh (mildly spiced chicken pieces marinated with tandoori spices and roasted in tandoor), a Machchi Patiala (deep-fried cumin flavoured fillet of fish), Aatishi Chop (spicy lamb chops marinated with Lucknowi spices and roasted in tandoor) and Murgh Malai Tikka (chicken marinated with cream, cashewnut cheese, curd and cardamom powder and roasted in clay oven).


Veggies can savour Subz Galouti Kabab (yam, ridge gourd, channa dal and galouti spices and cooked on a typical mahi tawa served with ulta tawa paratha), Zafrani Paneer Tikka (panner cubes marinated with cashewnuts, cheese and saffron, skewered and cooked in tandoor), Subz Sheekh Kabab (carrot, beans, potatoes, paneer, cauliflower and green peas, mashed and mixed with cumin powder and cardamom powder and skewered and cooked in tandoor), Malai Broccoli (Broccoli marinated with cream, cashewnut, cheese, curd and cardamom powder and roasted in clay oven) and Aloo Muttar Bharwan Tikki (potato pattice stuffed with green peas and cooked on mahi tawa).

Sink your teeth into the other kababs, and you are sure to feel like a Mongol sans the horse!

For details, call Radisson on 22310101.

PRINCE FREDERICK

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