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Hot and sizzling



A tandoori treat, dhaba style. — Photo: V. Sreenivasa Murthy.

FASHIONED LIKE a semi-dhaba, at the side of a building, this little new restaurant off Indiranagar 100 Feet Road is interestingly called Kund. It gets its name from kandoor, the original term used to describe the tandoor.

Here one gets only tandoori dishes here. Kund doesn't do much for your aesthetic expectations, but certainly pampers your taste buds gloriously. Sitting on wooden benches and tables, in the classic Punjabi dhaba style, one can choose to order tandoori delights from the chicken, lamb, fish or vegetarian platter.

Kund takes pride in its kababs, along with which the rest of the meal is served. Therefore, ordering a hara sabja chicken (whole chicken marinated in green masala and served dry) comes with a bowl of dal makhani, tava vegetables, salad, and two naans. All this comes at the cost of the hara sabja chicken itself. In effect, you've paid for the kabab and had an entire meal.

This tiny joint offers great value for money, especially when the food is priced at Rs. 65 upwards for a vegetarian kabab meal and Rs. 95 upwards for a non-vegetarian one.

Gurbachan Singh and his son Manjit Singh, who own Kund, say: "Our focus is on kababs. People can order that, without having to worry about what other dishes go with it. We take care of that, while we ensure that you get a full meal from a salad to a side dish."

Kund's must-have choices in the chicken section are the saffron tikka (chicken marinated in yoghurt and saffron) and chicken afghani (made with generous dollops of cashew nuts and cream). Also popular are the gelafi kababs. Made with minced chicken, capsicum, coriander, these just melt in your mouth.

The dishes have been carefully prepared with a different spice flavouring the preparation each time. While a til tikka is flavoured with sesame seeds, a chicken banjara kabab is boneless and comes with a strong flavour of cumin seeds. Again, in the lamb options, tikka kandhari uses a lot of amchur (dry mango powder), while kakori kabab has subtle flavours of nutmeg and cardamom.

Even vegetarians have quite a few options with different preparations of stuffed potatoes, stuffed brinjals, stuffed tomatoes, and stuffed capsicum.

Also available are kababs such as corn sheek, mixed vegetable sheek, and hara sheek. All the preparations at Kund can be eaten as a meal, as a snack (where only the kabab is served), or one can order separately from a selection of rotis and biryanis. Beverages such as jal jeera, kesari nimbu paani, and lassi add the right touch to this great Punjab experience! Kund can be contacted on 5281416.

* * *

  • Ambience: No frills, unpretentious.
  • Specialties: Saffron tikka, chicken afghani, and gelafi kabab.
  • Check out these too: Jal jeera, kesari nimbu paani, and lassi.
  • A meal for two costs: Rs. 130 upwards for a vegetarian and Rs. 190 upwards for non-vegetarian.

TINA GARG

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